1919 to 1893

Historical Highlights: 1910 to 1893

pharmacy building in Galveston

School of Pharmacy entrance requirements were strengthened to require the completion of two years of high school. Following the U.S.entrance into World War I, the program saw a doubling of the number of women students applying and being admitted to the school. 

The school continued throughout the war despite shortages of supplies and chemicals and the departure of both students and faculty to serve in the military. The Pharmacy Association of The University of Texas initiated a project to have each class adopt colors and hats to improve class spirit. 

Reconstruction of campus buildings following the devastating 1900 hurricane in Galveston resulted in the first expansions and improvements to the school. 

The UT School of Pharmacy was established at Galveston with a legislative allocation of $2,500 and with James Kennedy as chairman. 

picture of palma

1919

A new course, “Commercial Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Jurisprudence,” was instituted.

1918

The school continued throughout the war despite shortages of supplies and chemicals and the departure of both students and faculty to serve in the military.

1917

Following the U.S. entrance into World War I, the program saw a doubling of the number of women students applying and being admitted to the school.

picture of 1916 bevo

1916

School of Pharmacy entrance requirements were strengthened to require the completion of two years of high school. Longhorn mascot (1916), branded by Aggies with the score from a football game in which Texas A & M defeated UT. Longhorn Legend tells that fans later changed the brand to read “BEVO”.

1915

A hurricane damaged the medical and pharmacy departments, causing postponement of the fall semester for a few weeks.

1914

Classes were held six days a week. Long hours in the classroom and laboratories left little time for socializing.

picture of old red in Galveston shown from across the street

1913

The American Pharmaceutical Association recommended extending the required number of coursework hours to 1,200 for the undergraduate Pharmacy Graduate (PhG) degree.

1912

The student government executive committee drew up a new constitution giving female students the right to vote in campus elections.

1911

Dean Cline reported to the university president that work done by the School in “botany, vegetable microscopy, and the microscopic study of powdered drugs and chemicals was abreast with that of the very best schools in America.”

picture of mortar

1910

Completion of one year of high school became required for admittance to pharmacy school as histology, physiological chemistry, and bacteriology were added to the curriculum.

picture of 1910 hand bill

1909

The demand for pharmacy graduates from the school was growing so rapidly that the school was unable to satisfy it. 1910 handbill makes light of rain-out “hoodoo” during a track and field event.

1908

A Board of Regents’ appropriation to establish a botanical garden distinguished the school as one of the few to offer botanical instruction in this manner.

1907

The Texas legislature passed a bill establishing the State Board of Pharmacy to have jurisdiction over all matters of pharmacy throughout the state.

picture of 1906 lecture hall in Galveston

1906

A National Syllabus Committee was organized to develop guidelines for pharmacy education throughout the United States.

1905

The Lambda Chapter of Phi Delta Chi was founded, representing the school’s first student pharmacy fraternity.

1904

Course work in the areas of pharmaceutical, medicinal, and analytical chemistry was added to the curriculum.

picture of 1900 class

1903

Completion of the Galveston seawall provided invaluable protection for the School of Pharmacy against future hurricanes.

1902

By Fall 1902, reconstruction efforts following the hurricane were nearly complete, and pharmacy and chemistry laboratories were returned to operating condition.

picture of 1900 hurricane

1901

Reconstruction of campus buildings following the devastating 1900 hurricane in Galveston resulted in the first expansions and improvements to the school.

1900

The Pharmacy Association of The University of Texas initiated a project to have each class adopt colors and hats to improve class spirit. A hurricane hits Galveston causing vast destruction.

1899

The first scholarship, presented by the Texas State Pharmaceutical Association, consisted of $150 and was awarded to Frank Glasscock.

1898

An honors system within the school was established to give recognition to those students with an average grad of 90 or better.

picture of UT’s Championship Football Team, 1893

1897

The School of Pharmacy graduated its first women: May Everett, Bertha L. Howze, Sister Mary Etienne, and Sister Mary Rosalie.

1896

The Pharmaceutical Association of The University of Texas was organized to bring together all members of the Pharmacy Department. The first class in prescription compounding was added to the curriculum.

picture of 1890 Cline

1895

R.R.D. Cline assumed the leadership of pharmacy education. A. Eugene Dabney and W.E. Hubbert became the first graduates of the school in May.

1894

Classes during the first year occupied three rooms of the basement of the Medical Department’s “Old Red Building” in Galveston.

picture of 1890 old red in Galveston

1893

The UT School of Pharmacy was established at Galveston with a legislative allocation of $2,500 and with James Kennedy as chairman. Classes began on October 3, 1893.