1959 to 1940

Historical Highlights: 1959 to 1940

The Ph.D. program in pharmacy received final approval, marking a culmination of efforts by the faculty spanning six years. Esther Jane Wood Hall, a faculty member of the college, was awarded the first Ph.D.degree in pharmacy administration presented to a woman by an American university. 

The UT Board of Regents authorized the College of Pharmacy to operate the UT Student Health Center Dispensary. The Mortar and Pestle Club, the college’s first professional organization for women in pharmacy received a national charter and became the Xi chapter of Kappa Epsilon. 

two men looking at the camera

The College of Pharmacy continued classes as usual during the war, although the college itself remained in the center of a UT System debate over its future location. After much debate, the UT Board of Regents voted to retain the College of Pharmacy on the main campus in Austin. The college offered its first continuing education programs in the form of hospital pharmacy seminars.

picture of Dr. Delgado

1959

The college adopted a five-year Bachelor of Science program which included a sequence of two pre-professional years followed by three years of professional studies.

1958

In his annual report, Dean Burlage noted that the graduate program had developed slower than anticipated due to the low salaries budgeted for the college as compared with salaries for pharmacists in retail distribution.

1957

Esther Jane Wood Hall, a faculty member of the college, was awarded the first Ph.D. degree in pharmacy administration presented to a woman by an American university.

1956

Phi Delta Chi was revived through the efforts of William J. Sheffield, who served as faculty sponsor.

picture of university drug garden

1955

“A Study of Manpower in Texas Pharmacy,” a survey of pharmacy’s manpower requirements for the future, was published. It was conducted annually until 1976.

1954

The Ph.D. program in pharmacy received final approval, marking a culmination of efforts by the faculty spanning six years.

picture of new pharmacy building

1953

The Pharmacy Extension Service was inaugurated to provide in-service training and postgraduate education. William B. Harrell became the first black to receive a pharmacy degree at the College.

1952

Ceremonies to dedicate the Pharmacy Building were held as faculty, students, and staff moved into the long-awaited pharmacy facilities on the Austin campus.

1951

An American Council on Pharmaceutical Education visiting team conveyed official approval of the efforts of the dean and teaching staff to continue raising the standards of the program.

picture of 50scholar

1950

The Pharmaceutical Foundation of the University of Texas College of Pharmacy was established to support facets of the pharmacy program.

1949

The Master of Science degree in pharmacy was established and paved the way for advancements in pharmacy education, while the first annual refresher course, now called the Pharmacy Practice Seminar, was held.

1948

The college offered its first continuing education programs in the form of hospital pharmacy seminars.

picture of Dean Henry Burlage

1947

Henry M. Burlage joined the college as Dean, replacing Dean W. F. Gidley.

1946

After much debate, the UT Board of Regents voted to retain the College of Pharmacy on the main campus in Austin.

picture of wartime newspaper

1945

The College of Pharmacy continued classes as usual during the war, although the college itself remained in the center of a UT System debate over its future location. Wartime newspaper article indicates that most UT men and women who took the State Board of Pharmacy exam would be going into the armed forces right away.

1944

Government spokesmen announced that the combined military services would require as many as 10,000 to 15,000 pharmacists by the end of 1944.

picture of mortar

1943

The Mortar and Pestle Club, the college’s first professional organization for women in pharmacy received a national charter and became the Xi chapter of Kappa Epsilon.

1942

The drug house was built at a cost of $750. The first gardener was a pharmacy student, James Bauerle, who subsequently served on the UT Board of Regents.

1941

The Longhorn Pharmacist, a student-published journal, became the official publication for the UT Pharmaceutical Association. It served as a forum for student ideas with enrollment now approaching 300.

picture of World War II blackout

1940

The UT Board of Regents authorized the College of Pharmacy to operate the UT Student Health Center Dispensary. WWII affected campus life in many ways. This 1940 newspaper article recalls air-raid drills that darkened the UT Tower and the Texas Capitol.