Faculty Earn State Grants for Cancer Research

A person in a lab.
September 21, 2022
The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) has released its grant research funding awards for the upcoming year. All three awarded research projects at The University of Texas at Austin involve College of Pharmacy faculty.

Celebrating the Latest Awards, Appointments and Achievements from the UT Pharmacy Community

Pharmacy building on UT campus
July 5, 2022
From student scholarships to national recognition awards to prestigious appointments, the UT Pharmacy community has a lot to celebrate and be proud of right now.

Dalby Earns CPRIT Grant for Drug Delivery Program

A person wearing a mask in a lab.
September 16, 2021
The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) recently awarded grants to six faculty members at UT Austin, including the Division of Chemical Biology and Medicinal Chemistry's Kevin Dalby, Ph.D. for his Targeted Therapeutic Drug Discovery and Development Program.

Research Provides Further Insight into Causes of Manganese-Induced Parkinsonism

A man smiling in a research lab.
September 7, 2021
Somshuvra Mukhopadhyay, M.B.B.S., Ph.D., associate professor in the Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology and Hamm Centennial Fellow in Pharmacy, and a team of researchers have released new findings defining the first homeostatic regulatory pathway for manganese in mammalian systems. Identifying these pathways opens up new possible options to prevent or treat manganese-induced parkinsonism and other disorders linked to elevated manganese exposure.

Williams Talks to KXAN About How Thin Film Freezing Can Help Treat COVID Patients

A man wearing glasses.
July 30, 2021
Division Head and Professor of Molecular Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery Dr. Bill Williams was on KXAN News to talk about promising new data from TFF Pharmaceuticals and Augmenta Bioworks. The companies plan to develop Dr. Williams' thin film freezing technology to better deliver antibody treatment directly to the lungs of COVID patients.

Has a UT Professor Found a Way to Stop COVID-19 Vaccines From Spoiling?

A fruit roll treat floating in the clouds with a rainbow behind it and small viruses hovering around it.
February 24, 2021
Molecular Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery Professor Maria A. Croyle, Ph.D. received extensive coverage in the March 2021 edition of Texas Monthly regarding her innovative peelable film drug delivery research. Among its many potential applications, Dr. Croyle’s technology could deliver COVID-19 vaccines through a small oral strip, without need for refrigeration or extensive storage and transportation infrastructure.

Croyle Earns Funding for SARS-CoV-2 Research

A woman smiling.
January 13, 2021
Molecular Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery professor Maria A. Croyle R.Ph., Ph.D. earned 2021’s David Lehr Research Award from the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET). Dr. Croyle will receive research funding to investigate novel regulatory mechanisms of drug metabolism in the context of active infection with SARS-CoV-2 and after recovery.

Williams Wants to Turn COVID-19 Vaccine into Powder to Help with Storage and Distribution

A powder in a vial.
November 25, 2020
Molecular Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery Professor Robert O. (Bill) Williams III, Ph.D. talks to CBS Austin about the potential for his thin film freezing technology to increase the shelf life of COVID-19 vaccines when they become available.

Cherish Taylor Wins Three Minute Thesis Competition

A woman wearing glasses and smiling.
November 13, 2020
Neuroscience graduate student Cherish Taylor took home the top prize in the Graduate School’s Three Minute Thesis competition. Taylor is a graduate student in the lab of Somshuvra Mukhopadhyay, M.B.B.S., Ph.D. in the College of Pharmacy’s Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology.

Inhaled Niclosamide a Potential Effective Antiviral to Treat COVID-19

An infrared image of nasal spray being administered.
September 29, 2020
Researchers in the lab of Dr. Hugh D.C. Smyth have released promising results of a new method to treat SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. The antiviral niclosamide, when incorporated with human lysozyme as a carrier molecule, shows potential as an effective COVID-19 treatment when delivered directly to the airways.