Moczygemba and Wash Earn 2022 Kloesel Grant

A woman and a man smiling.
January 11, 2022
Leticia "Tish" Moczygemba, Pharm.D., Ph.D. and Andrew Wash, Pharm.D. were selected as the recipients of the 2022 grant award from the Arlyn Kloesel Endowment for Excellence in Pharmacy Practice.

Opioid Use Disorder Paper Earns ACCP Award

A box of naloxone vials.
October 8, 2021
A paper from UT College of Pharmacy researchers was awarded the 2021 Outstanding Paper of the Year from the American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) Ambulatory Care Practice Research Network. The paper investigates the availability of buprenorphine and naloxone in Texas to treat opioid use disorder.

Texas Pharmacy Rises to #8 Nationally for Total Research Funding

#8 Total Research Funding Rank for UT Pharmacy.
June 15, 2021
The University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy moved up in several research funding categories, as reported in the newly-released rankings from the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP). The college rose to #8 nationally in total research funding during the 2019-2020 fiscal year, compared to #9 in 2018-2019.

Improving Health Outcomes for People Experiencing Homelessness is Focus of New Study

Five people holding cell phones and wearing masks.
April 30, 2021
Combining mobile health technology, or mHealth, and community outreach to improve the health outcomes of people experiencing homelessness is the target of a new study led by Division of Health Outcomes Associate Professor Leticia Moczygemba, Pharm.D., Ph.D., thanks to a five-year research grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.

TxCORE Research Wins PhRMA Foundation Award

Three people smiling.
April 1, 2021
Three researchers from the College of Pharmacy won an award from the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) Foundation. Leticia R. Moczygemba, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Carolyn M. Brown, Ph.D. and Michael Johnsrud, Ph.D., R.Ph. were awarded $5,000 from the PhRMA Foundation for their proposal to advance racial and ethnic representation in value assessments.

Has a UT Professor Found a Way to Stop COVID-19 Vaccines From Spoiling?

A fruit roll treat floating in the clouds with a rainbow behind it and small viruses hovering around it.
February 24, 2021
Molecular Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery Professor Maria A. Croyle, Ph.D. received extensive coverage in the March 2021 edition of Texas Monthly regarding her innovative peelable film drug delivery research. Among its many potential applications, Dr. Croyle’s technology could deliver COVID-19 vaccines through a small oral strip, without need for refrigeration or extensive storage and transportation infrastructure.

Croyle Earns Funding for SARS-CoV-2 Research

A woman smiling.
January 13, 2021
Molecular Pharmaceutics and Drug Delivery professor Maria A. Croyle R.Ph., Ph.D. earned 2021’s David Lehr Research Award from the American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics (ASPET). Dr. Croyle will receive research funding to investigate novel regulatory mechanisms of drug metabolism in the context of active infection with SARS-CoV-2 and after recovery.

Inhaled Niclosamide a Potential Effective Antiviral to Treat COVID-19

An infrared image of nasal spray being administered.
September 29, 2020
Researchers in the lab of Dr. Hugh D.C. Smyth have released promising results of a new method to treat SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. The antiviral niclosamide, when incorporated with human lysozyme as a carrier molecule, shows potential as an effective COVID-19 treatment when delivered directly to the airways.

New Thin Film Technology to Revolutionize Storage and Distribution of Biologic Treatments and Vaccines

A hand touching a transparent sheet.
September 29, 2020
The newly-formed Jurata Thin Film will work to bring Dr. Maria Croyle's thin film technology to market, allowing biologics and vaccines to be packaged, shipped, and stored at room temperature for extended periods of time.

Starving prostate cancer cells

John DiGiovanni Headshot march 2010
June 8, 2017
A new study identifies several natural compounds found in food, including numeric, apple peels and red grapes, as key ingredients that could thwart the growth of prostate cancer. Read more about starving cancer cells.