Vasquez Writes in Nature Reviews Genetics on Alternative DNA Structures

"Nature Reviews Genetics" written inside of a circle.
November 1, 2022
Division Head and Professor of Pharmacology & Toxicology Karen Vasquez, Ph.D. published in the latest issues of Nature Reviews Genetics regarding repetitive elements in the human genome. Once considered "junk DNA," they are now known to adopt more than a dozen alternative DNA structures. These dynamic conformations can act as functional genomic elements involved in DNA replication and transcription, chromatin organization and genome stability.

Faculty Earn State Grants for Cancer Research

A person in a lab.
September 21, 2022
The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) has released its grant research funding awards for the upcoming year. All three awarded research projects at The University of Texas at Austin involve College of Pharmacy faculty.

Vasquez Appears on BBC World Service to Discuss Z-DNA

DNA.
June 16, 2021
Division Head and Professor of Pharmacology and Toxicology Karen Vasquez, Ph.D. appeared on BBC World Service's Science in Action to talk about Z-DNA. Dr. Vasquez's research focuses on DNA damage and repair, genomic instability, gene targeting, DNA structure and cancer therapeutics.

Texas Pharmacy Rises to #8 Nationally for Total Research Funding

#8 Total Research Funding Rank for UT Pharmacy.
June 15, 2021
The University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy moved up in several research funding categories, as reported in the newly-released rankings from the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy (AACP). The college rose to #8 nationally in total research funding during the 2019-2020 fiscal year, compared to #9 in 2018-2019.

Fight Against Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria Has a Glowing New Weapon

A 3D representation of the chemical probe as it bridges two zinc molecules
June 2, 2021
Chemistry Assistant Professor Emily Que, Ph.D. and the College of Pharmacy’s Walt Fast, Ph.D. are working together to research new methods to fight against antibiotic resistance. The fluorescent chemical probe developed by Que and Fast may help find a different way to combat resistant bacteria.

TxCORE Research Wins PhRMA Foundation Award

Three people smiling.
April 1, 2021
Three researchers from the College of Pharmacy won an award from the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA) Foundation. Leticia R. Moczygemba, Pharm.D., Ph.D., Carolyn M. Brown, Ph.D. and Michael Johnsrud, Ph.D., R.Ph. were awarded $5,000 from the PhRMA Foundation for their proposal to advance racial and ethnic representation in value assessments.

Kompella Receives Fulbright Award for Postdoctoral Research

A woman smiling.
March 16, 2021
Division of Pharmacology and Toxicology researcher Pallavi Kompella, Ph.D. has received a Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program award to research at the Biomedical Research Institute of Málaga in Spain.

Inhaled Niclosamide a Potential Effective Antiviral to Treat COVID-19

An infrared image of nasal spray being administered.
September 29, 2020
Researchers in the lab of Dr. Hugh D.C. Smyth have released promising results of a new method to treat SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. The antiviral niclosamide, when incorporated with human lysozyme as a carrier molecule, shows potential as an effective COVID-19 treatment when delivered directly to the airways.

Richburg Receives NIH Grant Award for Toxicant Injury Research

A man smiling
August 10, 2020
Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies John H. Richburg, Ph.D. received notice from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarding him a research grant for a five-year term. The NIH’s grant award for Dr. Richburg’s research totals $2,694,316.

Gore receives five-year NIH grant to research PCBs

gore large
April 2, 2019
Pharmacology and Toxicology Professor Andrea C. Gore, Ph.D. recently received an impressive five-year RO1 grant from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes for Health (NIH), for research to determine how PCBs cause dysfunctions in reproductive physiology and behavior.