Questions & Answers

  1. What is a problems course?
  2. What about Graduate School?
  3. When do pharmacy students work in the Forty Acres Pharmacy?
  4. Where can I locate a notary public?
  5. What is the State Board of Pharmacy and where is it?
  6. When do the requirements of history, government, and non-pharmacy electives have to be completed?
  7. How many hours do I need to take during the summer to be considered a full-time student?
  8. What is an “internship”?
  9. Where can I learn more about the region assignments and the internships?


1. What is a problems course?

One to three semester hours of pharmacy elective credit can be received by working with a professor in a specialized area of interest within pharmacy. A handout describing individual faculty members’ research emphasis is available in the Student Affairs Office, PHR 5.112. To take a problems course, see the instructor in the area of interest for specific suggestions and sponsorship. All students who wish to enroll in an undergraduate problems course must complete the Faculty Approval Form for Enrollment in Undergraduate Problems Courses (available in PHR 5.112), and submit it to the Students Affairs Office before they can be registered for the course. Additional information about research in the College is available at http://pharmacy.utexas.edu/research/


2. What about Graduate School?

Talking with professors in your area of interest is a good way to get an understanding of graduate work in the area. The Graduate Advisor and the Associate Dean for Research and Graduate Studies can also answer questions and direct students to other sources of information about UT graduate programs and other programs throughout the nation. There is also a bulletin board containing information about graduate programs around the nation, located in the hallway of the north pharmacy building across from Room 2.214. More information is accessible at http://pharmacy.utexas.edu/research/.


3. When do pharmacy students work in the Forty Acres Pharmacy?

Students work a fixed, supervised schedule (without pay) as a part of PHR 186Q (Experiential Pharmacy and Patient Counseling) during the Spring of year 2 or Summer or Fall of year 3 of the professional sequence.


4. Where can I locate a notary public?

For official University business, go to the Registrar’s Office, Main Building, Room 1. For personal business, go to the University Co-op.


5. What is the State Board of Pharmacy and where is it?

The Texas State Board of Pharmacy is the state agency that registers interns, and examines and licenses all applicants for pharmacy licensure in the State of Texas. It consists of members who are appointed by the Governor and serve overlapping terms. The office is located in the William P. Hobby Building at 333 Guadalupe Street, Austin, Texas 78701-3972. Telephone: (512) 305-8000; http://www.pharmacy.texas.gov/.


6. When do the requirements of history, government, and non-pharmacy electives have to be completed?

These courses do not have to be completed before entering the Pharmacy School Professional Sequence; however, they must be completed by the end of the spring semester of the third professional year.


7. How many hours do I need to take during the summer to be considered a full-time student?

Our college does not require a minimum number of hours during the summer. You must take nine hours to be considered full-time for full financial aid purposes. If you take less than nine hours, consult your financial aid advisor. Any other questions should be referred to the Student Affairs Office of the College of Pharmacy, PHR 5.112.


8. What is an “internship”?

Introduction

Section 283.2 of the Texas Pharmacy Rules clearly defines the term “intern”, or more specifically, “student-intern” as one who is registered with the board, and enrolled in the professional sequence of courses in a college of pharmacy who has successfully completed the first professional year with a minimum of 30 credit hours towards a professional degree in pharmacy. Once the application for intern registration is approved and the intern card issued, the student may function as an intern as described in §283 of the Rules, but ONLY under the supervision of a Texas State Board of Pharmacy (TSBP)-approved preceptor in a pharmacy licensed by the Board.

Students may also be designated as intern-trainees during the first professional year. However, intern-trainees may only work in sites assigned by the school for experiential-based coursework. Students in the first year of the pharmacy program cannot be employed as interns. The word “internship”, however, is a little more difficult to define, since it is used to describe a variety of pharmacy-related experiences. Hopefully, the various descriptions below will help further explain what an “internship” might mean when this term is used at The UT Austin College of Pharmacy.

The Internship (Experiential) Program that is part of The University of Texas College of Pharmacy professional curriculum

The experiential program of The UT Austin College of Pharmacy satisfies ALL of the internship hours required for licensure in the state of Texas and in most other states. The experiential program encompasses several professional sequence courses. The majority of internship hours required for licensure are earned through the P4 senior rotation courses, or Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience (APPE) courses. Students will also participate in Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences following the second year of the curriculum, an OTC laboratory, patient counseling, and other courses through which experiential/internship hours are earned. These course-based practice experiences are non-paid.

A competitive Internship*

These are the competitive state and national enrichment experiences with primarily the pharmaceutical industry, federal agencies, and national and state associations, although some may be sponsored by other organizations. To distinguish this type of experience from other internships, we refer to these as “competitive internships”.

As it is received, the Student Affairs Office provides students with information regarding these experiences via e-mail or other methods. Pay attention to deadlines! If interested, students must apply for these internships, and will usually be competing with other pharmacy students from across Texas and/or the US, depending on the internship. Some of these experiences provide a stipend, although it is usually only enough to cover living expenses during the internship.

Students are encouraged to do their own research regarding available competitive internships through web searches, networking through professional organizations, classes, etc.

A job Internship*

Once a student receives a TSBP intern card, he/she may be employed in a Class A or Class C pharmacy as a student-intern and perform the functions of an intern under the supervision of a TSBP-certified preceptor as described in §283 of the Texas Pharmacy Rules. A student-intern may function as a pharmacy technician under the direct supervision of a pharmacist under certain circumstances. Refer to §283.5 for more information.

However, a note of caution: Although the pay may be slightly higher, or you may feel pressured by an employer to act as a student-intern in the practice setting, you must be extremely cautious about assuming intern duties you do not feel qualified to perform. Some students with considerable pharmacy experience may feel comfortable with the possibility of expanded duties (beyond those of a technician, for example), while others with limited or no experience may be overwhelmed at the additional responsibility. REMEMBER—PATIENT LIVES ARE AT STAKE, so do not “bite off more than you can chew”.

Should you have any questions regarding intern status or internships, please see Assistant Dean Jennifer Ridings-Myhra in the Student Affairs Office.

*Internship hours gained from participating in these internships are not required for licensure in Texas, but may satisfy internship requirements for licensure in other states. Also, hours earned to not replace any rotations during the senior experiential year.


9. Where can I learn more about the region assignments and the internships?

Visit the Experiential website.

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